Barbados Demands Sexual Rights and Freedom for All

The recent events in Jamaica surrounding the brutal murder of a 16-year-old boy described as a "cross-dresser" by the media should be a wakeup call for people in Barbados and across the Caribbean more generally.


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Jamaican Activist Honored for Leadership in Challenging Homophobia

Securing Funds for Sexual and Reproductive Health in Mexico

Although Mexico has one of the largest economies in Latin America, persistent inequality presents major challenges to development. With more than 50% of the country’s total income held by the wealthiest 20%, access to education, employment, and health services—particularly for youth—remains out of reach for millions. Compounding these challenges is the fact that young people are becoming sexually active at a younger age; however, only an estimated 25% of Mexican youth use contraception the first time they have sex.


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Two Regions, One Movement for Accountability

A “Year of Action” to End Inequality

In yesterday's State of the Union address, President Barack Obama pledged to expand opportunity for all Americans and reverse the trend of economic inequality in the United States. He said, "Let’s make this a year of action."


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What are Your Hopes for the Next Four Years?

Working with Governments to Reduce Teen Pregnancy

Though lifetime fertility has fallen to 2.6 births per woman in the Dominican Republic, adolescents face limited access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services. The adolescent fertility rate remains high, at 98 births per 1,000 women ages 15 to 19, and high rates of unintended pregnancy are still a problem.


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Two Regions, One Movement for Accountability

Better Meeting the Needs of Youth in Panama

In Panama, young people are routinely denied access to comprehensive sexuality education and health services that meet their real-life needs. As a result, teenage pregnancy rates remain high. Although the Panamanian government has outlined national health care standards, and signed on to several international commitments that uphold the right to health care, young people in Panama often encounter a different reality.


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Two Regions, One Movement for Accountability

Promoting Youth Participation in Bolivia

Young people between the ages of 10 and 24 account for more than a third of the Bolivian population. The issues related to their sexual and reproductive health are staggering:

• Every hour in Bolivia, three teenagers get pregnant.
• One in five Bolivian youth are unaware of any contraceptive method.
• Adolescents make up 25% of people living with STIs and HIV/AIDS.


Related:
Two Regions, One Movement for Accountability

Two Regions, One Movement for Accountability

Five years ago, we set out on an exciting and unique journey. As part of the Millennium Development Goals, governments agreed to ensure universal access to critical reproductive health services such as contraception and care during pregnancy. While we were excited by the prominence that reproductive health had gained in the global development agenda, we also knew what it would take to realize this ambitious goal: strong coalitions of civil society leaders that are able to hold their governments accountable to their commitments.


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Latin America Demands Government Accountability

Connecting Sex and Safety with Theater

In the capital city of Caracas—nestled at the base of the impressive Mount Avila, which separates the city from the Caribbean Sea—theater is changing the lives of young people in Venezuela.


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Changing the Tide in the Region

When 19-year-old Adrianna became pregnant, she didn’t understand what had happened. “My boyfriend said he was taking care of himself,” she explains. Adrianna, who lives in the Victor Gonzales squatter settlement in El Callao, Peru, with her 11-month-old son and five other relatives, hadn’t received any sexuality education. She knew what a condom was, but not how to use it. “I would have liked the school to teach girls about sexuality, how to protect ourselves, avoid infections, and avoid surprises later,” she says.


Related:

A Regional Fight for Comprehensive Sexuality Education

In August 2008, at the International AIDS Conference in Mexico City, health and education ministers from Latin America and the Caribbean signed a historic agreement—the Ministerial Declaration, “Preventing through Education”—to dramatically increase young people’s access to comprehensive sexuality education and sexual and reproductive health services by 2015.


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¿Qué Pasó Con Lo Firmado?: I Demand My Sexuality Education
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